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Associated Records

Image of 69-71 Anson Street (Thomas Doughty House) - Property File

69-71 Anson Street (Thomas Doughty House) - Property File

Constructed ca. 1806; restored 1960. At the death of Daniel Legare, his daughter Mary Legare, wife of Thomas Doughty, inherited the lot. The Doughtys had apparently constructed a previous house on the site, replacing it by 1806 with the present structure. The dwelling has an unusual T-shaped plan that allows for windows on three sides of the principal rooms. A chambered staircase stands at the north end of the center hall. On the exterior the simple brick face is ornamented by a curvilinear, Anglo-Dutch style brick screen. On the interior the building contains finely detailed Adamesque woodwork. (Poston: Buildings of Charleston.) File contains two files contain documentation of the c

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Compiled Plat of Property Owned by Historic Charleston Foundation - Plat

Title of drawing: Compiled Plat of Property Owned by Historic Charleston Foundation Date of drawing: June 1971 Name of creator: Compiled by Cummings & McCrady Scale 1" = 20'

Image of 74 Anson Street (Michael Foucaut House) - Property File

74 Anson Street (Michael Foucaut House) - Property File

Constructed ca. 1812; moved to its present location from 15 Wall Street in 1966. Originally built by a carpenter as his residence on Wall Street in the developing neighborhood of Middlesex. The building is a two-and-a-half story Charleston single house with beaded weatherboard siding and a simple one-story piazza. When the city decided to clear the former Middlesex neighborhood for construction of the Gaillard Auditorium, HCF bought the house and moved it to this location in 1966. Similar in form to its larger neighbor at 61 Laurens. Two files contain documentation of the covenant on the property including title to real estate (describing restrictions); annual inspection reports; reque

Image of 5 Alexander Street (Simon Jude Chancognie House) - Property File

5 Alexander Street (Simon Jude Chancognie House) - Property File

Simon Jude Chancognie constructed this comparatively large 3-story house in about 1813. The house retains excellent Federal woodwork on its interior. (Poston, Buildings of Charleston.) Alexander Street is a/k/a Middle Street. Two folders contain original documentation of the easement on the property including Subordination Agreement; Part I certification (National Register); documents and correspondence relating the sale of the property over the years (1965-1987), including Contract of Sale (8/14/87) and Sale Agreement (April 1970); easement appraisal report by Hartnett Realty Co., 12/19/2008) and Form 8283; inspection letters and reports (1995-2001), including post-Hugo Condition Report (

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No. 5 Alexander Street, Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Logan - Drawing, Architectural

Title of Drawing: 5 Alexander Street, Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Logan Date of Creation: 9/1975 Name of Creator(s): not indicated 1st Floor Plan, 2nd Floor Plan ("3rd Floor Similar") East Elevation, West Elevation, South Elevation. Drawings also include electrical / lighting plans. Date is handwritten on drawings.

Image of 80 Alexander Street (Gadsden-Dewees House) - Property File

80 Alexander Street (Gadsden-Dewees House) - Property File

Constructed 1800-1810; altered ca. 1886. Site of that portion of Mazyck's Pasture where a "noble live oak tree" was formally dedicated to "liberty" by Charleston's John Wilkes Club in 1766. Owned by the Gadsden estate, this and adjoining parcels were acquired by William Dewees, a planter and wharf owner, 1n 1807. A subsequent owner added the piazzas, the Greek Revival door surrounds, and the Victorian window heads. A third story and roof were damaged and removed after the earthquake of 1886. (Poston, Buildings of Charleston.) File contains handwritten (staff) research sources notes, with attachment providing a brief history regarding the Liberty Tree Marker and WCSC Broadcast Museum.

Image of 82 Anson Street (Mary Smith House) - Property File

82 Anson Street (Mary Smith House) - Property File

Constructed ca. 1799; moved to its present location from 86 Anson Street in 1967; restored 1973. One of Charleston's wealthiest 18th century merchants, Josiah Smith, leased and subsequently conveyed this house an its former lot to his daughter, Mary Smith, in 1799. The building is a tall brick Charleston single house, formerly situated on a lot 100 feet north of its present site. It was moved in 1967, out of the path of the city's extension of George Street east from Anson Street to connect with East Bay Street, in conjunction with the construction of the Gaillard Auditorium. The dwelling is now arranged to face a large garden that fronts on Laurens Street. Although the house had suffered sin

Image of 2 Amherst Street (Presqu'ile) - Property File

2 Amherst Street (Presqu'ile) - Property File

Constructed ca. 1802, attributed to Jacob Belser, who purchased the property in 1802. A 3-story stucco over brick house with a two story piazza on the east, west, and south sides. Has unusual floor plan of 2 rooms per floor with a rear projecting stairhall with a circular staircase. Endgabled roof is pedimented with a fanlight on the south, and palladian windows in both the east and west gable ends. Noted for its rich neoclassical interior ornamentation. Located on lot 64 of the Village of Hampstead which was subdivided and developed by Henry Laurens in 1770. Purchased in 1840 by Henry Grimke, who added an expansive addition. Remained in the Grimke family until 1907. Historic Charleston Found