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Search Terms Beaufain Street

Associated Records

Image of 4 Beaufain Street - Property File

4 Beaufain Street - Property File

No history on file. File contains architectural plans for a proposed renovation, presumably presented to the BAR in 2005.

Image of 20 Beaufain Street (Memminger Normal School) [a/k/a 7-11 St. Philip Street] - Property File

20 Beaufain Street (Memminger Normal School) [a/k/a 7-11 St. Philip Street] - Property File

Constructed 1858, demolished 1950. Edward C. Jones, architect; Benjamin Lucas, contractor. The Normal School for the training of female teachers was designed by Edward C. Jones in 1857 and built by contractor Benjamin Lucas on the site of the old St. Philip's Episcopal Church parsonage in 1858. Jones designed the large and impressive building, which had an arcaded front portico and a high mansard dome. The school was later named for Col. Christopher Gustavus Memminger, who was the most active participant in the start of normal schools in South Carolina and a leader in establishing Charleston’s public school system in the 1850s. Memminger also served as Secretary of the Treasury for the Confed

Image of 39 Beaufain Street (James Holloway House) - Property File

39 Beaufain Street (James Holloway House) - Property File

Home of James Holloway, who ran a harness shop and lived at this Beaufain Street address through the mid-1930s, as did his ancestors. House was demolished when Beaufain and Market Streets were joined. No building history on file. Needs further research. File contains occupancy history from Old Codgers' Charleston Address Book; article about the Holloway Scrapbook, which includes family history and information about the Brown Fellowship Society and slavery.

Image of 56 Beaufain Street (Memminger Auditorium)  - Property File

56 Beaufain Street (Memminger Auditorium) - Property File

Constructed ca. 1938. Albert Simons, architect. Scholars of Robert Mills have recognized the relationship of the design of this school and civic auditorium to the work of Charleston's most famous native born architect, particularly because of the inset Doric columns of the portico. Plans for restoration of this important classic theater, long a venue for Charleston music and civic events, remain uncertain. File contains newspaper articles; history from Buildings of Charleston and from Information for Guides of Historic Charleston (scant); brief historical research notes. Image #2 is of the house previously on the site.

Image of 63 Beaufain Street (Theresa McHugh Tenement), 65 Beaufain Street (Richard Brenan Tenement), Currently Robert Mills Manor - Property File

63 Beaufain Street (Theresa McHugh Tenement), 65 Beaufain Street (Richard Brenan Tenement), Currently Robert Mills Manor - Property File

63 Beaufain Street (Theresa McHugh Tenement) was constructed ca. 1849. 65 Beaufain Street (Richard Brenan Tenement) was constructed ca. 1806-1816. Both structures reflect 19th century design in the tradition of the Charleston single house. Made of stuccoed brick, they have west facing piazzas on both the first and second floors. Tuscan columns support the piazzas and ventriculated quoins decorate the structure on 63 Beaufain. Sidelights and a glazed transom accentuate the main entry off of the piazza. The older of the 2 structures, 65 Beaufain, was constructed Richard Brenan. It is assumed that this property was used as a rental property by Brenan since the city directories of the period do n

Image of 64-68 Beaufain Street (Francis Quinlan McHugh Tenements) - Property File

64-68 Beaufain Street (Francis Quinlan McHugh Tenements) - Property File

Constructed ca. 1850-53; rehabilitated mid-1980s. The attorney Francis Q. McHugh purchased a parcel on the north side of Beaufain Street, extending from Coming Street to Kirkland Lane. He intended to build speculative dwellings such as those he had constructed at 22-24 Wentworth Street in Ansonborough. Apparently, McHugh sold 68 Beaufain to the mason Thomas Divine with the provision that he complete a dwelling on the lot as well as buildings for McHugh which were already under construction. The two McHugh houses were completed as 3-story stuccoed single houses with flat roofs and simple parapets. Double-tiered piazzas with Tuscan columns shade the south facades of each structure. McHugh sold

Image of 70 Beafain Street (Catherine Mashburn House) - Property File

70 Beafain Street (Catherine Mashburn House) - Property File

Constructed ca. 1868-71. The Divine-Huchet property was apparently subdivided by the 1860s when a small dwelling was constructed at 70 Beaufain Street, at the corner of Kirkland Lane, which is an alley running north toward Wentworth Street. Catherine Mashburn apparently built this small, gabled, 2-story house with a front piazza between 1868 and 1871. By the 1880s Thomas Finlay was using the ground story as a grocery store. File contains handwritten (staff) research source notes.

Image of 71 Beaufain Street (Calvary Chapel) - Property File

71 Beaufain Street (Calvary Chapel) - Property File

No history of the chapel on file. However, it was presumably constructed in 1848 (113 years prior to article date). Efforts were made to save and preserve the building, which was once a "Negro congregation," but it had been condemned ca. 1960 and ordered demolished by the Charleston Housing Authority. The lot was to be put up for sale. File contains newspaper article, "Calvary Chapel Demolition Ordered by City Officials," 7/26/1961.