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Image of 237 King Street (Ahrens Grocery Building) - Property File

237 King Street (Ahrens Grocery Building) - Property File

Constructed 1870; restored 1986. Abrahams and Seyle, architects; John H. Lopez, contractor. Charles D. Ahrens and George Kriette bought this burned-out site with the shell of a building in 1870, immediately thereafter beginning construction of the present edifice. When completed, Ahrens Grocery moved their wholesale and retail operation here, and Mr. Ahrens lived upstairs for about 7 years before the rooms were rented to a succession of men's c ...

Object Type: Archive

Image of 243 King Street (Siegling Music House) - Property File

243 King Street (Siegling Music House) - Property File

Constructed ca. 1838; exterior rehabilitated and interior altered 1984-85. John Siegling, a native of Erfurt, Germany, established a music store in 1819, selling harps, pianos, and wind instruments. Moving his business from Meeting Street to King Street, he rebuilt on the site of a building destroyed in the fire in 1838 at the corner of King Street and Beaufain Street. Remaining in business until 1970, the company was advertised as "America's ...

Object Type: Archive

Image of 244-246 King Street - Property File

244-246 King Street - Property File

Double building constructed by John Hunter after the great fire of 1838. File contains newspaper article (Jan. 9 [no year] DYKYC) and captioned photograph from Preservation Society newsletter. Image #3 from 1967 King Street Photographic Survey.

Object Type: Archive

Image of 245-247 King Street (Nathan Hart Buildings) - Property File

245-247 King Street (Nathan Hart Buildings) - Property File

Constructed ca. 1838; rehabilitated 1986. Nathan Hart, who also constructed 220 King Street, built these 2 brick edifices, probably shortly before his death in 1840. When auctioned by his estate, Hart's widow purchased 245 King Street and his daughter, Mrs. Mordecai Levy, bought 247 King Street. The building's original 3rd story was removed in the late-19th century. The first floor of the corner building retains its cast-iron pilasters, suppo ...

Object Type: Archive

Image of 249 King Street - Property File

249 King Street - Property File

Built 1875-1876 by Susan Wood to replace a building that had been destroyed by fire. Designed by Charleston architect John Henry Devereux. Occupied by J.R. Read & Co. in the early part of the 20th century. File contains newspaper article (1982 DYKYC); description of J.R. Read & Co. from "Resources & Attractions of Charleston" (ca. 1898) with photo of interior of the store; Rosen and Associates inspection report (2003). Digital image only.

Object Type: Archive

Image of 250 King Street - Property File

250 King Street - Property File

Housed the carpet and drapery firm of C.B. Prentiss for almost 50 years. No additional building history on file; needs further research. File contains newspaper article about plans for the building to be demolished; occupancy history from Old Codgers' Charleston Address Book. Image #1 in this record is from document in the Property File.

Object Type: Archive

Image of 253 King Street (Carrington-Thomas Building) - Property File

253 King Street (Carrington-Thomas Building) - Property File

Constructed ca. 1890; renovated 1918. Originally built as a men's clothing store, this structure was renovated for use by the Citizens Bank. Exhibiting a form of Beaux Arts classicism, an engaged, pedimented portico with Ionic columns frames an arched doorway with a central console bracket. Although the building is now a jewelry store, its original bank interior, used from 1918 to 1958, still survives. File contains photocopies of photog ...

Object Type: Archive

Image of 254 King Street (Moses Levy Building) - Property File

254 King Street (Moses Levy Building) - Property File

Constructed 1838. Moses Levy, who also built 311 East Bay Street and lost numerous buildings in the fire of 1838, had begun construction of this 3-story building shortly before his death in 1839. From the start the structure was rented to Charleston's most famous antebellum silversmithing firm, Hayden, Gregg and Company. Generally used as a hardware store since the late-19th century, the building has lost most of its storefront in the process of ...

Object Type: Archive